New Rhythms and Moves & PWR! Classes (Updated)

Updated with corrected times
Symphony Neurological Rehabilitation’s Spring classes at Vibe Studio 

start next Tues. May 23,  

 
Pre-registration is required thru Symphony clinic 250-618-4548 
 
$80/8 weeks (we miss the weeks when the Parky group meets)

 
TIMES:
 
12:00-1:00pm 12:30 – 1:30 pm Rhythms and Moves for Brain Health (corrected times)
 
1:45- 2:45 pm  PWR! Moves (adapted exercise, seated class)
Contact info. for our instructor Genya –  
250-739-0589

Cycling and Parkinson’s

An NBC news article on cycling and Parkinson’s disease was brought to my attention by one of our members.  Thanks Susan! The research shows that a few hours of ‘intense’ cycling a week can relieve PD symptoms. In fact the article says: “(cycling) can even do something that medicine can’t – slow down the progression of the disease itself.”  As the neuroscientist Jay Alberts at Cleveland Clinic says: “Exercise is, in fact, medicine.”

Jay founded an organization called “Pedaling for Parkinson’s” which promotes cycling for managing PD symptoms and has helped set up numerous cycling programs at YMCAs across America.

Hmmm! Maybe we should be running PD cycling classes here in Nanaimo…

 

Fanga

Our new drumming class appears to be a success. We had 22 drummers in the third week up from 12 in week one. One thing that makes the class interesting is that it is not just about drumming. There’s hand-clapping, knee-slapping, foot-stomping and even singing.

The song that Dave has been teaching us is called Fanga (though it is often pronounced and written ‘funga‘) and is worth saying more about.

Fanga is an African greeting song. In our version, each line is sung first by the instructor and then echoed back by everyone else. The lyrics that we learned are:

Fanga alafia, ashe ashe

Fanga alafia, ashe ashe

Ashe ashe

Ashe ashe

Fanga alafia, ashe ashe.

Note that ‘ashe’ is pronounced ‘a-shay’. The song Fanga was written by Babatunde Olatunji, a Nigerian born who spent much of his life introducing African music to America. The words are from the Yoruba language of Nigeria while the melody is taken from the American song ‘Li’l Liza Jane‘. See the Wikipedia link for Fanga song for more historical information.

But fanga is not just a song – it is also a rhythm and a dance. Here are some audio and video links for Fanga that are worth checking out:

Now if we could just get our dancers, drummers and singers together maybe we could put on quite a show.

 

Communicating with Drums

I recently came across a YouTube video of a presentation called Do You Speak Djembe?  In light of the new PD drumming class that our Nanaimo PD support group helped start earlier this month, I thought that this would be worth mentioning.

The talk was part of a one day series of TEDx talks given under the theme of Technology vs Humanity in Hollywood in September 2016.  The drummer-presenter, Doug Manuel, makes a case for the importance of community in our lives and the drums ability to help bring together people into communities.

Doug’s message is interesting but, to me at least, the drum-dominated music is the reason to watch the video. Listen and you’ll find it hard not to be drawn in.

 

 

 

Cognition, Memory & Yoga

Laura Frey, who runs the Nanaimo Yoga class for persons with PD, recently forwarded the following link to me: Cognition and Memory in Parkinson’s Disease and Yoga: An Interview with Richard Rosen.

Richard Rosen is a California Yoga teacher who has adapted his program as a result of his PD diagnosis. The interviewer starts by asking:

What has been your personal experience with how yoga can affect cognitive function and memory?

Richard’s answer begins:

As soon as you’re diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease (PD), if you’re not already a yoga student, get yourself to a yoga class…

That’s pretty powerful. Read the whole interview – there’s lots more interesting insight and several links at the end of the interview for those wanting to dig deeper. And underneath the interview window is a whole new blog, Yoga for Healthy Aging, to explore.

Drumming is Coming to Nanaimo

Drumming (therapy) classes for PWP (Persons with Parkinson’s) is coming to Nanaimo.

After a successful demonstration at the February PD Support Group, the first of four weekly hour-long classes will take place on Wednesday March 1 2017 at 3pm. If all goes well and interest is good, there will be more sessions to follow.

Lessons will be led by Dave McGrath, a local Nanaimo drummer who also makes his own African style hand drums which we will use for the lessons. If you are interested in participating or just want more information and you are not a member of the support group (in which case you would have received an invitation email from us) then send us a message through the Contact Menu.

Djembe Drums By Vahram Mekhitarian - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link
Djembe Hand Drums
Image by Vahram MekhitarianOwn work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

 

Drumming as Therapy

A page on the about.healing.com website on the Therapeutic Effects of Drumming (accessed 2017-02-26) has the following:

Drum therapy is an ancient approach that uses rhythm to promote healing and self-expression. From the shamans of Mongolia to the Minianka healers of West Africa, therapeutic rhythm techniques have been used for thousands of years to create and maintain physical, mental, and spiritual health.

Current research is now verifying the therapeutic effects of ancient rhythm techniques. Recent research reviews indicate that drumming accelerates physical healing, boosts the immune system and produces feelings of well-being, a release of emotional trauma, and reintegration of self.

Other studies have demonstrated the calming, focusing, and healing effects of drumming on Alzheimer’s patients, autistic children, emotionally disturbed teens, recovering addicts, trauma patients, and prison and homeless populations. Study results demonstrate that drumming is a valuable treatment for stress, fatigue, anxiety, hypertension, asthma, chronic pain, arthritis, mental illness, migraines, cancer, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, stroke, paralysis, emotional disorders, and a wide range of physical disabilities.

The article goes on to say:

Drumming Accesses the Entire Brain

The reason rhythm is such a powerful tool is that it permeates the entire brain. Vision for example is in one part of the brain, speech another, but drumming accesses the whole brain. The sound of drumming generates dynamic neuronal connections in all parts of the brain even where there is significant damage or impairment such as in Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD). According to Michael Thaut, director of Colorado State University’s Center for Biomedical Research in Music, “Rhythmic cues can help retrain the brain after a stroke or other neurological impairment, as with Parkinson’s patients…” The more connections that can be made within the brain, the more integrated our experiences become.

I’ve been to several of Dave McGrath’s evening group lessons and they are both fun and challenging – good exercise for the brain and the arms.

Research on Dancing and Parkinson’s

On January 23, CBC had an interesting article on Dancing and it’s effects on people with Parkinson’s Disease. The article, Dancing with Parkinson’s research, is worth a read. If you’re interested in trying a little dancing, Symphony Neuro-Rehab will run a Dance with Parkinsons class if enough people sign up.